The New York Times Book Review - Graphis

It’s hard enough to review a book in 800 words. But to address book-size questions about the nature of literature in that space is probably impossible. If the Internet requires a constant stream of takes, on matters of all sizes, the New York Times Book Review does not. And to impose this mentality on the country’s last free-standing book section seems like a particularly cruel trespass. So leave the essay prompts to the high school freshmen, Times Book Review, and let the writers make something new.

The New York Times Book Review. Woody Talks

What was the first illicit or forbidden novel you read? Flowers in the Attic? Forever...? Fifty Shades of Grey? The New York Times Book Review .


Fabulous cover artwork for the New York Times book review, by .

Algonquin Talks with Greg Cowles, The New York Times Book Review

February 9, 2012 — The New York Times Book Review editor, Sam Tanenhaus, interviews William J. Broad, a New York Times journalist and author of the controversial new book, ‘The Science of Yoga.’


The new york times book review pictures 1 The new york times book review pictures 2 The new york times book review pictures 3 The new york times book review pictures 4 The new york times book review pictures 5The world's top authors and critics join host Pamela Paul and editors at The New York Times Book Review to talk about the week's top books, what we're reading and what's going on in the literary world.Pamela Paul is the editor of The New York Times Book Review and the author of Parenting, Inc., Pornified, and The Starter Marriage and the Future of Matrimony. Prior to joining the Times, Paul was a contributor to Time magazine and The Economist, and her work has appeared in The Atlantic, The Washington Post, and Vogue. She and her family live in New York. What was the first illicit or forbidden novel you read? Flowers in the Attic? Forever...? Fifty Shades of Grey? The New York Times Book Review . In honor of its upcoming Sex issue, the Book Review will be publishing the best responses on Friday, along with essays from Nicholson Baker, Alison Bechdel, Rachel Kushner, Geoff Dyer and Jackie Collins. We're especially interested in hearing what dirty book first shocked Baker, whose phone sex ode Vox instantly comes to mind with the phrase "illicit books."